Lectures Upon the Ecclesiastical History of the First Three Centuries, from the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ to the Year 313; In 2 Volumes Volume 1

Lectures Upon the Ecclesiastical History of the First Three Centuries, from the Crucifixion of Jesus Christ to the Year 313; In 2 Volumes Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1842 edition. Excerpt: ...he was a member of the court of Areopagus, he held a station, which, in the better days of Greece, was one of the highest and most honourable, which any city could confer. Unfortunately, his history is so mixed up with fable, that we scarcely know what to believe. That he was in Egypt at the time of the crucifixion, and had his mind impressed by the preternatural darkness, though asserted by more than b Wolfius ad Act. xvii. 22. A. D. one writer, is a tradition which few would believe0. The books, which are still extant as written by him, are undoubtedly spurious, and were perhaps forged in the fourth or even in the sixth century1. Whether he was an author at all, or at least of any Christian writings, may reasonably be questioned: though perhaps the fact of so many works being ascribed to him, may confirm the tradition of his having been a man of learning. That he was bishop of the church of Athens, is reported by another Dionysius, who was himself bishop of the Corinthian church toward the end of the second centurye: and the age of this witness, as well as his station and character, and the proximity of the two cities, make it improbable, that he should have been mistaken in this fact. At the same time it is a suspicious circumstance, that several persons, who are mentioned in the New Testament, are said to have been bishops of the places connected with their names. Thus Cornelius is said to have been bishop of Caesarea, and to have succeeded Zacchaeus, though it is highly improbable, that either of them filled such an office. Perhaps the tradition is received with greater scepticism, because persons are unwilling to believe, that bishops, in the modern sense of the term, existed at all in those early times. But this is to let an argument...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236639227
  • 9781236639226