Learning to be Chinese American

Learning to be Chinese American : Community, Education, and Ethnic Identity

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Description

Based on original ethnographic material collected in an upper-middle class Chinese American community, this book aims at exploring the complicated identity production process within the community in relation to the rapidly changing global and local contexts. The book is expected to expand the scope of existing literature on identity production among immigrants of color in both empirical and methodological terms.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 152 pages
  • 157.48 x 231.14 x 17.78mm | 430.91g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • New.
  • 0739138480
  • 9780739138489
  • 2,095,535

Review quote

With thoughtful analyses and rich ethnographic data, Liang Du's research on the daily practices and experiences of Chinese American youth within their community-based education brings new understandings of how ethnic communities can serve both as crucial structural and institutional support for ethnic identity production and as contesting sites for power struggle against the dominant racial discourses. This critical perspective offers unique insights into immigrant youth's complex identity work within the global-local nexus. This engaging book makes important contributions to the studies of Chinese American education and immigrant youth studies in the era of globalization. -- Guofang Li, Michigan State University Moving between the local and the global, Liang Du's Learning to Be Chinese in New Times draws our attention to the identity formation processes among a group of middle and upper middle class Chinese American youth inside a rapidly shifting global context. Du offers a highly detailed and provocative ethnography set inside a community based Chinese American cultural institution, as he simultaneously turns his keen analytical eye towards the intersectional ties of class and race in increasingly complexlocal, national and global realities. Beyond the power packed punch of Du's fascinating and highly readable ethnography lie important theoretical challenges to our understanding of the ways in which culture, ethnicity, identity and class are produced andco-produced in a shifting global context. Tackling the production of Chinese American identity formation amidst widespread global realignment, Du's detailed ethnographic work takes an important step towards globalizing our research imagination, therebychallenging us to study diasporic communities in new ways. Learning to Be Chinese in New Times is a must-read for all those interested in community based cultural institutions, Chinese Americans, and the ever shifting ties between parents and chi -- Lois Weis, State University of New York Distinguished Professor, author of Class Reunion: The Remaking of the American White Working Class Moving between the local and the global, Liang Du's Learning to Be Chinese in New Times draws our attention to the identity formation processes among a group of middle and upper middle class Chinese American youth inside a rapidly shifting global context. Du offers a highly detailed and provocative ethnography set inside a community based Chinese American cultural institution, as he simultaneously turns his keen analytical eye towards the intersectional ties of class and race in increasingly complex local, national and global realities. Beyond the power packed punch of Du's fascinating and highly readable ethnography lie important theoretical challenges to our understanding of the ways in which culture, ethnicity, identity and class are produced and co-produced in a shifting global context. Tackling the production of Chinese American identity formation amidst widespread global realignment, Du's detailed ethnographic work takes an important step towards "globalizing our research imagination", thereby challenging us to study diasporic communities in new ways. Learning to Be Chinese in New Times is a "must-read" for all those interested in community based cultural institutions, Chinese Americans, and the ever shifting ties between parents and children in diasporic communities all over the world. -- Lois Weis, State University of New York Distinguished Professor, author of Class Reunion: The Remaking of the American White Working Classshow more

About Du Liang

Liang Du is assistant professor in the School of Education at Beijing Normal University.show more

Table of contents

Chapter 1: Chinese Americans: Community, Education, and Identities Chapter 2: Rationales behind an Education: "That Box Doesn't Belong to You" Chapter 3: The Creation of a Diaspora Identity Chapter 4: The Limits of Ethnicity: Community-based Education as a Contesting Site Chapter 5: Learning to Be Chinese Americans in New Times: Community, Identity, and Globalizationshow more