Learning Politics From Sivaram

Learning Politics From Sivaram : The Life and Death of a Revolutionary Tamil Journalist in Sri Lanka

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Description

This is the story of the life and impact of the political activist, journalist and freedom-fighter Sivaram Dharmeratnam, who dedicated his life to helping the Tamil people in Sri Lanka.He started out as an active participant in the war against the Sri Lankan government - and was labelled a 'terrorist'. Yet he stepped away from ruthless violence. Instead, he became a high profile journalist in the Sri Lankan press, and used his position to fearlessly critique the government, despite repeated threats on his life. Finally, in 2005, Sivaram was assassinated.This vivid life history also engages with much broader issues. It offers an intimate portrait of why an educated man adopts a position of supporting violence.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 272 pages
  • 134 x 212 x 20mm | 358.34g
  • PLUTO PRESS
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0745323537
  • 9780745323534
  • 1,398,167

About Mark P. Whitaker

Mark Whitaker is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at University of South Carolina, Aiken. He received his PhD in 1986 from Princeton. He has written widely on Sri Lanka, including an ethnography of a Hindu temple entitled Amiable Incoherence , published by a Dutch university press in 1999.
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Table of contents

Note on Transliteration, Translation, Names and Neutrality

Three Prologues

1. Introduction: Why an Intellectual biography of Sivaram Dharmeratnam?

2. Learning Politics from Sivaram

3. The Family Elephant

4. Ananthan and the Readers Circle

5. From SR to Taraki - a 'serious unserious' journey

6. From Taraki to TamilNet: Sivaram as journalist, military analyst and Internet pioneer

7. States, Nations and Nationalism

8. Return to Batticaloa

Bibliography

Index
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Review quote

This book has been long-awaited by many scholars, and others concerned about the conflict in Sri Lanka. It could become a new exemplar of how anthropology should be done. -- Margaret Trawick, Professor of Social Anthropology, Massey University, New Zealand 'Very interesting and original. The concerns he raises have been central to American anthropology for twenty years' -- Thomas Eriksen, Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo
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Rating details

14 ratings
4.28 out of 5 stars
5 29% (4)
4 71% (10)
3 0% (0)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)
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