The Leadbeater Papers; Unpublished Letters of Edmund Burke, and the Correspondence of Mrs. Richard Trench and REV. George Crabbe

The Leadbeater Papers; Unpublished Letters of Edmund Burke, and the Correspondence of Mrs. Richard Trench and REV. George Crabbe

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1862 edition. Excerpt: ... some injury in declaring religious subjects unfit for poetry. If you would write a volume of Nursery Dialogues, supposed to pass between a mother, her children, the nurses, and the nursery maids, it might be of incalculable utility. It is a subject so ripened in your mind, you would have little more to do than to put your ideas into the dialogue form. From the throne to the cottage the chief pleasures of all who have feeling hearts must flow from their children, and indeed of many who have not feeling hearts; and I am very doubtful whether they are not more essentially necessary to the happiness of the poor than of the rich. I observe in England great use made by the poor of donkeys, which, when properly fed and kindly treated, seem much more suitable to the cottage than the halfstarved horse of the Irish peasant. I cannot answer your query about the Duchess of York. I remember ten years since hearing a gentleman who was nicely attentive to his own convenience, lament that eight or ten of her dogs occupied every good place near the fire, and made her drawing-rooms extremely offensive. She passes for being what is called "a good sort of a woman"--a person of whom nothing can be cited remarkable enough to merit praise or blame. I was presented to her at her first drawing-room, when her manner was uncommonly gentle, and her appearance pleasing. As to the Eegent, it is suspected that he will leave his wife as much in the shade when Queen as he does now; and the observers argue thus, from having always heard people say, "When the Prince is Eegent, he must produce the Princess; the public would not hear of his doing otherwise; no lady would attend the court if she did not preside; I am sure, for one / would notyet, after all these...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 110 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 213g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236554876
  • 9781236554871