Le Droit Des Gens; Translation of the Edition of 1758, by Charles G. Fenwick, with an Introduction by Albert de Lapradelle Volume 3

Le Droit Des Gens; Translation of the Edition of 1758, by Charles G. Fenwick, with an Introduction by Albert de Lapradelle Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...in so far as they are based upon an inequality in the position of the contracting parties. It is true that an unequal treaty is generally at the same time an unequal alliance, since great potentates are not in the habit of giving more than is given them, or of promising more than is promised them, unless they are compensated by being shown greater respect and honors; and, on the other hand, a weaker State does not submit to onerous conditions without being obliged at the same time to recognize the superiority of its ally. These unequal treaties, which are at the same time unequal alliances, are divided into two classes, the first including those in which the greater obligations fall upon the more powerful State, and the second those in which the greater obligations are on the side of the weaker State. In the first class the more powerful State, while not being conceded any right over the weaker, is shown superior honors and respect. We have spoken of such treaties in Book I, 5. It frequently happens that a great monarch desiring to have a weaker State on his side will offer it favorable terms and promise it gratuitous assistance, or at least greater assistance than is required from it in turn; but at the same time he will claim for himself a superiority of position and demand deference from the weaker State. It is this last point which constitutes the unequal alliance, and care must be taken not to confuse such alliances with those in which the parties treat with each other as equals, although the more powerful State for some special reason gives more than it receives, promises gratuitous assistance without exacting the same in return, or promises greater help or even the help of all its forces. In this case the alliance is equal but the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 278 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 15mm | 499g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236607996
  • 9781236607997