The Lay Folks Mass Book; With Rubrics and Devotions for the People, in Four Texts, and Office in English According to the Use of York, from Manuscripts of the Xth to the Xvth Century Volume 71

The Lay Folks Mass Book; With Rubrics and Devotions for the People, in Four Texts, and Office in English According to the Use of York, from Manuscripts of the Xth to the Xvth Century Volume 71

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...the distinction between the layman and the ecclesiastic was more rigidly marked, and in the course of time restrictions, which were more or less generally observed, were imposed by synods and councils. About t lie middle of the fourth century it was prescribed at Laodicea (Cun. 44) that women should not enter the sanctuary, (2) and (Gin. 19) that only priests and deacons(3) should enter the sanctuary and cominuniculo. But at the end of this century (a.d. 390) this rule was not observed at Constantinople, at least in (respect to the Emperor, as we kuow from the account which Theodoret gives of the admission of Theodosius to communion at Milan, by St Ambrose, after he had been excommunicated by him. When he brought his gifts to the holy table, i.s wus the custom, he was going to remain within the rails, to receive the Divine sacraments, "but the great Ambrose taught him a lesson as to the distinction of places," that within was for priests ulonc, and that " the purple made emperors, not priests," and the emperor thereupon in all good part explaiucd that it was not out of arrogance that he had remained within the rails, but because he knew it to be the custom at Constantinople.(4) (1) CuHgtit. Jl/nixt. 11, c. xxvii. Murtuiiu in the Voymjc I.ittcraire dt deux ltelijicux lieitcd'wt'int describes an incident in a parish church near Basle, which proves not only that the more simple, practice of an earlier age had survived to the beginning of the eighteenth century, but also that the rule as to the exclusion of women was not of more force in the diocese of Basle than, as we shall see, it was in this country. He says (Vol. I, Partie 2, p. 141-2): "Nous entendimes ensuite la messe paroissiale, et nous reuiarquAuics que les...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 192 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236940679
  • 9781236940674