The Lay Folks' Mass Book; Or, Manner of Hearing Mass with Rubric and Devations for the People in Four Texts And, Offices in English According to the Use of York from Mss. of the Xth to the Xvth Century

The Lay Folks' Mass Book; Or, Manner of Hearing Mass with Rubric and Devations for the People in Four Texts And, Offices in English According to the Use of York from Mss. of the Xth to the Xvth Century

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1879 edition. Excerpt: ...Theodoreti Ecclet. Bid. V, 18, Ed. Gaisford, p. 439-40. At the Trullan or Quinisext Council of Constantinople, A.D. 692, the rule as to exclusion of laymen from the sanctuary was again ordained (Can. 69), but with an exception in favour of the emperor " when he desired to bring gifts to his Maker." Nothing is said as to his communicating, but it would seem that the custom of his going within the sanctuary survived from the time of () It is not ii little curious In eoimee.tion with this laying on the altar of their offering by lay people by their own hands to find individual offerers spoken of as " singuli sacrt ficantes" in the rubric of a MS. Missal for the diocese of Basic of the tenth century.--Martene, 1, 216 b. Similar regulations became general in the West, An Ordo Bomanus which reaches back to before the eighth century describes the reception of the gifts in kind from the laity, who remained in their appointed places according to their degree, whilst the clergy went about the church.(1) Cardinal Bona(2) quotes a capitular of Charles the Great, ordaining that they should offer on every Lord's day, and that their oblation should be received outside the rails or chancel skreen, "/oris septa."(Ji) Theodulph of Orleans, about the same time, applied the rule of exclusion to women only. This capitular, being translated into English in the tenth century, may be supposed to have had a certain amount of authority in this country;(4) but whether the exclusion of women from the altar ever obtained in the Church of England, or not, there can be no doubt there was no objection to women going up to the altar to offer at the date of our manuscript. Chaucer's Wife of Bath will occur to many of my readers: "In al the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236544382
  • 9781236544384