The Laws of Masters and Servants Considered; With Observations on a Bill Intended to Be Offered to Parliament, to Prevent the Forging of Certificates of Servants' Characters. to Which Is Added an Account of a Society Formed for the

The Laws of Masters and Servants Considered; With Observations on a Bill Intended to Be Offered to Parliament, to Prevent the Forging of Certificates of Servants' Characters. to Which Is Added an Account of a Society Formed for the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1790 edition. Excerpt: ... permit any certain rule for the prices of flesh meat, which were afterward referred to be fixed occasionally by the lords of the privy council, and by the chief magistrates of towns. "We shall conclude these observations on proviso) Fleetwood, 94.--It is remarked, that the number of butchers in London, and its suburbs, did not at this time exceed eighty; each of whom killed nine oxen weekly, which, in forty-fix weeks (none being then killed in Lent) amounts to thirty-three thousand one hundred and twenty oxen yearly. The present average calculation of oxen, or black cattle, and stieep, yearly sold at Smithficld, is, oxen 94,000; sheep, and lambs, 800,000; and the quantity of wheat supposed to be consumed in London, and its suburbs, at this time 1789, is in London per week 20,000 sacks; in the kingdom at Jarge 140,000, on the average of 20,000 sacks per day through the kingdom, exclusive of London.--It is said that in the year 1590 there were only about 160,000 people in London, whereas it is now supposed to contain near one million.--At the above period, K33, every substantial houlholder, in proportion to his rank, commonly maintained a number of oxen and sheep, which were slaughtered at the end of autumn, and salted for the winter provision, and conveyed from place to place, which may account for the few number of butchers in the metropolis at that time.--In some parts of the north, the custom cf salting provisions for wimer use still prevails. flora fions and wages, with remarking, that if we compare the prices of grain and labour in the former and present times, the gain will be found on the side of modern labourers. The price of a bushel of wheat is fixed in the first statute at ten pence, or about twenty shillings a quarter in our money;...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236657837
  • 9781236657831