The Law Reports, Chancery Appeal Cases; Including Bankruptcy and Lunacy Cases, Before the Lord Chancellor, and the Court of Appeal in Chancery Volume 6

The Law Reports, Chancery Appeal Cases; Including Bankruptcy and Lunacy Cases, Before the Lord Chancellor, and the Court of Appeal in Chancery Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1871 edition. Excerpt: ...the resolutions passed at the Church meeting held on the 24th of October." A meeting was accordingly held on the 31st of October, at which forty-eight members were present, when the minutes of the previous meeting were read, and a resolution was unanimously passed, "That the above minutes be passed, confirmed, and ratified." The Defendant, considering that he was not legally dismissed, attempted to enter the chapel, and was resisted by force. He then indicted for a riot several of the persons concerned. Other disturbances took place; and on the 15th of March, 1869, the bill in this suit was filed to restrain the Defendant from taking possession of the chapel or acting as minister. The Defendant contended that the notices had not been read in the chapel, and that the meeting was illegal. The Vice-Chancellor James dismissed the bill with costs, being of opinion that the notice for the meeting of the 31st of October, 1868, was insufficient (1). The Plaintiffs appealed. (1) 1870. Feb. 22. Bennett before the meeting wu called, Sib W. M. James, V.C., after stating so that he might have an opportunity the facts, and that in such a case every-of knowing what he was to meet. At thing ought to have been done in the that meeting a resolution was passed strictest form, continued: --rescinding a resolution of the previous It appears to me that, if a meeting meeting, but of the intention to pass was summoned for the purpose of such a resolution no notice whatever bringing charges, those charges ought was given. to have been communicated to Mr. The second resolution was, that in It was stated at the Bar that these resolutions and proceedings were entered in different books in the custody of different persons; but that all the members of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 400 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 21mm | 712g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236516540
  • 9781236516541