The Law Reports; Cases Determined by the Chancery Division of the High Court of Justice and by the Chief Judge in Bankruptcy and by the Court of Appeal on Appeal from the Chancery Division and the Chief Judge in Lunacy Volume 8

The Law Reports; Cases Determined by the Chancery Division of the High Court of Justice and by the Chief Judge in Bankruptcy and by the Court of Appeal on Appeal from the Chancery Division and the Chief Judge in Lunacy Volume 8

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...or object may have existed in the mind of the testatrix when she made this devise of the residue, the Plaintiffs have entirely failed to shew that any secret trust for charity was communicated to, much less accepted or acquiesced in by, the Defendants or either of them. I am of opinion that the decree must be reversed and the bill dismissed. I assume that in such a case no costs will be asked for." Finally, the same principle was acted upon by the House of Lords in the case of McCormich v. Grogan (1). There the facts were these: The testator, several years before his death, had made his will in favour of a friend, Mr. Grogan, having very many near relations. He was seized with cholera, and on the day of his death--a few hours, indeed, before his death--he sent for Mr. Grogan and told him he had made a will in his favour, and that he would find a letter in a particular drawer. Mr. Grogan said he did not know where the drawer was. The testator was a large (1) Law Eep. 4 H. L. 82. Tnercbant who had a number of clerks, and he said, "My clerks v.-c. M. will tell you," and accordingly in the drawer was found a letter 1878 expressing the wish of the testator as to various dispositions which R0wbotham he said were not to be obligatory on Mr. Grogan, and Mr. Grogan never saw the letter in the lifetime of the testator. When he was told by the testator, "I have made my will, and given you everything," he said, " Can that be right?" The testator said, "Yes, I will not have it otherwise." The result was that Mr. Grogan took all the property. He seems to have been treated by the House of Lords with the greatest possible respect, as a man acting with great probity in the matter, in carrying out the wishes of the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 340 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 18mm | 608g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236575466
  • 9781236575463