The Law of Railways; Including the Consolidation and Other General Acts for Regulating Railways in England and Ireland, with Copius Notes of Decided Cases on Their Construction, Including the Rights and Liabilities of Volume 2

The Law of Railways; Including the Consolidation and Other General Acts for Regulating Railways in England and Ireland, with Copius Notes of Decided Cases on Their Construction, Including the Rights and Liabilities of Volume 2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1855 edition. Excerpt: ...the ground of acquiescence, by conduct not amounting to a renunciation of his right to interfere, but being in fact a protestation from time to time against the injury complained of, with a view to an amicable adjustment. (See post.) The Court of Chancery is always open both for granting and dissolving injunctions, and it is competent to the court to appoint any day for hearing a motion that the judge may think fit. (Lane v. Barton, 1 Phil. C. C. 363; Fielding vCapes, 4 Madd. 393.) F601 'An undertaking entered into with a court of equity is equivalent to and will have the efi'ect of an injunction, so far as that the infringment thereof may be made the subject of an application to the court. (London and Birmingham Railw. Co. v. Grand Junction Canal Co., 1 Railw. C. 224.) Assistance of The Court of Chancery will seek information from some::, 'f';, n: : r: b_ impartial engineer where the aflidavits on engineering points wined-are conflicting. (Mauser v. Northern and Eastern Coun--ties Railw. Co., 2 Railw. C. 380.) A point involving questions of practical science being in dispute, and the aflidavits being conflicting, the evidence was at the suggestion of the court, and with the consent of both parties, referred to an engineer for his report on the question in dispute, and the conclusion of the engineer with respect to the facts was adopted by and made the ground of the order of the court. (Webb v. Manchester and Leeds Railw. Co., 1 Railw. C. 576; 4 My. do Cr. 116.) The Court of Chancery, or any judge thereof, in such way as they may think fit, may obtain the assistance of accountants, engineers, or other scientific persons, for the better determining any matter at issue in any cause or proceeding, and act upon the certificate of sushow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 395g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236753828
  • 9781236753823