The Law and the Practice of New Jersey; From the Earliest Times, Concerning the Probate of Wills, the Administration of Estates, the Protection of Orphans and Minors, and the Control of Their Estates; The Prerogative Court, the Ordinary,

The Law and the Practice of New Jersey; From the Earliest Times, Concerning the Probate of Wills, the Administration of Estates, the Protection of Orphans and Minors, and the Control of Their Estates; The Prerogative Court, the Ordinary,

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1909 edition. Excerpt: ...vested in the Governor or his delegate under the prerogative seal.... At the passing of the Act of 1692, the Goveenor appointed a surrogate or deputy for the business of the prerogative court and since that period a constant succession of surrogates have been commissioned by the Governors under the prerogative seal. yet performed the prerogative court business in the same place where the Secretary held and excercised his oftlce."--N. Y. Col. Docs, VII., 324. The bill was introduced April 28. 1691, and passed by the House May 2, but was not passed until November 14, 1692.--Jour1u1l0fthe General Assc4nbly of New York, New York. 1764, I., 9. 21, 28. "The powers relative to probate of The Governor and the Assembly were at swords' points on this and every other matter of administration, and nothing came of this demand for better probate facilities in the Province, during his time. When Lord Lovelace was appointed Governor of the Province to succeed Lord Cornbury, the Lords of Trade, in sending him her Majesty's instructions, on june 23, 1708, referred to this complaint of the New jersey Assembly, commenting favorably upon the remonstrance, in the following language: "'Tis true that the probate of Wills and Granting of Letters of Administration, is by Her Majesty, entrusted with the Governor; Yet we do not see that the settling such an office in each Division in New Jersey, as proposed by the Remonstrance for the Ease of Her Maj.esty's Subjects there will be a lessning of the Rights of Prerogative, or of the Governor."2 Lord Lovelace lived too short a time to carry out the proposed reform, but his successor, Colonel Robert Hunter, acceded to the wishes of the people.3 After the custom of the day, the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236916700
  • 9781236916709