The Law-Dictionary; Explaining the Rise, Progress, and Present State, of the English Law Defining and Interpreting the Terms or Words of Art and Comprising Copious Information on the Subjects of Law, Trade, and Government Volume 1

The Law-Dictionary; Explaining the Rise, Progress, and Present State, of the English Law Defining and Interpreting the Terms or Words of Art and Comprising Copious Information on the Subjects of Law, Trade, and Government Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1811 edition. Excerpt: ... is a bar material, and a bar at large; bar material may be also called special bar; as when one, in stay of the plaintiff's action, pleadeth some particular matter, viz. a descent from him that was owner of the land, &c. a feoffment made by the ancestor of the plaintiff, or the like; a bar at large is, when the defendant, by way of ex-ception, doth not traverse the plaintiff's title, by pleading, nor confess, nor avoid it, but only makes to himself a title in his bar. IStch. 68. 5 Hen. VII. 29. See tit. Abatement, Action, Judgment, and especially Pleading. This word Bar is likewise used for the place where serjeants and counsellors at law stand to plead the causes in court; and where prisoners are brought to answer their indictments, &c. whence our lawyers, that are called to the bar, are termed barristers. 2$ Hen. VIII. c. 24. BARRASTER, BARRISTER, barrasterias. A counsellor learned in the law, admitted to plead at the bar, and there to take upon him the protection and defence of clients. They are termed jurisconsulti; and in other countries called licentiati in fure; and anciently barristers at law were called apprentices of the law, (from the French apprendre to learn, ) in Eat. apprcnticii juris nobiliores. Fortesc. The time be-fore they ought to be called to the bur, by the ancient orders, was eight years, now reduced to five; and the exercises done by them, (if they were not called ex gratia, ) were twelve grand moots performed in the inns of chanccry, in the time of the grand readings, and twenty-, four petty moots in the term times, before the readers of the respective inns; and a barrinter newly called was to attend the six (or four) next long vacations the exercise of the house, viz. in Lent and Summer, and was thereupon for...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 270 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 14mm | 485g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236550617
  • 9781236550613