The Law-Dictionary; Explaining the Rise, Progress, and Present State, of the English Law Defining and Interpreting the Terms or Words of Art and Compr

The Law-Dictionary; Explaining the Rise, Progress, and Present State, of the English Law Defining and Interpreting the Terms or Words of Art and Compr

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1811 edition. Excerpt: ...Tithe; but if they are not obliged to make the Tithe into hay, they may leave it in cocks, and the parson must make it, for which purpose he may come on the ground, &c. A prescription to measure out and pay the tenth acre, or part of grass standing, in lieu of all Tithe hay, may be good: And if meadow ground is so rich, that there are two crops of hay in one year, the parson, by special custom, may have Tithe of both. 1 Roll. Abr. 643. 647. 950.--HeadLands are not tithable, if only large enough for turning the plough; but if larger, Tithe may be, and generally is, payable. 2 Inst 653.--Hemp; see Flax--Herbage of ground is tithable for barren cattle kept for sale, which yield no profit to the parson. Wood's Inst. 167.--Honey pays a Tithe, see Bees.--Hops are tithable, and the tenth part may be set out after they are picked. It is now settled, on appeal to the House of Lords, that hops ought to be picked and gathered from the Bines before they are tithable: And then measured in baskets, before being dried, and every tenth basket set out for the Tithes; and no usage can vary this rule. 2 Bos. and Pull. 172. 7 Term Re/i. K. B. 86: And see Bro. P. C. title Tithes Horses kept to sell, and afterwards sold, Tithes shall be paid for their pasture; though not where horses are kept for work and labour. Hutt. 77--Houses for dwelling are not properly tithable: A modus may be paid for houses in lieu of Tithes of the land upon which they are built; and a great many cities and boroughs have a custom to pay a modus for their houses: as it may be reasonably supposed that it was usual to pay so much for the land, before the houses were erected on it. 11 Refi. 16: 3 Inst. 659. See title London (Tithes;) and ante V. Kids pay a Tithe as calves, the tenth is due to...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 254 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 458g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236632281
  • 9781236632289