The Latest Form of Infedelity Examined; A Letter to Mr. Andr. Norton Occasioned by His Discourse Before the Association of the Alumni of the Cambridge Theol. School

The Latest Form of Infedelity Examined; A Letter to Mr. Andr. Norton Occasioned by His Discourse Before the Association of the Alumni of the Cambridge Theol. School

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1839 edition. Excerpt: ...of the divinity which it claimed, steal away the inspiration which rested on their souls, Jer. i. 5, 7, 18. 1 J er. xxiii. 28, 29. and reduce them from the sublime distinction of prophets of Jehovah to the level of Jewish enthusiasts. I will close this part of the discussion with the example of John the Baptist, the forerunner and friend of the Messiah. He was declared by the highest authority to be a prophet, whom no one born of woman could surpass. Yet John wrought no miracle.1-What is yourlview of the mission of-John? Was it from Heaven, or of men? If you say, from Heaven, you take back your doctrine. If you say, of men, you oppose the declaration of Christ. 2. In the second place, the Scriptures present examples of divine messengers, who, although they performed miracles, did not appeal to them as the SOLE evidence of their mission. If they sometimes referred to their miracles as proofs that they were commissioned from Heaven, it is far from being the case, that they never referred to any thing else. An examination of the mode in which they pre ented their claimsto dvine authority will show you that your exclusive ground-cannot be maintained. We need only consider some passages in the history of our Savior himself. When John the Baptist sent from the prison to inquire of Jesus, whether he were indeed the Messiah, or whether the coming of another were still to be expected, Jesus, in the first place, directs the attention of the messengers to the works which he performed. They were the acknowledged credentials of the Messiah. But this was not all. He does not confine himself to the mention of the miracles. He does not speak of them in a way which would lead one to suppose that he regarded them as the exclusive testimony-to his mission....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236649702
  • 9781236649706