The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa. from Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-Five to His Death. Continued by Narrative of His Last Moments and Sufferings, Obtained from His Faithful Servants Chuma and Susi

The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa. from Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-Five to His Death. Continued by Narrative of His Last Moments and Sufferings, Obtained from His Faithful Servants Chuma and Susi

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ... P.m., and showed great bravery, but they wounded only.two with their arrows. Their care to secure the wounded was admirable: two or three at once seized the fallen man, and ran off with him, though pursued by a great crowd of Banyamwezi with spears, and fired at by the Suaheli--Victoria-cross fellows truly many of them were! Those who had a bunch of animals' tails, with medicine, tied to their waists, came sidling and ambling up to near the unfinished stockade, and shot their arrows high up into the air, to fall among the Wanyamwezi, then picked up any arrows on the field, ran back, and returned again. They thought that by the ambling gait they avoided the balls, and when these whistled past them "they put down their heads, as if to allow them to pass over: they had never encountered guns before. We did not then know it, but Muabo, Phuta, Ngurue, Sandaruko, and Chapi were the assailants, for we found it out by the losses each of these five chiefs sustained. It "was quite evident to me that the Suaheli Arabs were quite taken aback by the attitude of the natives. They expected them to flee as soon as they heard a gun fired in anger; but instead of this we were very nearly being cut off, and should have been but for our Banyamwezi allies. It is fortunate that the attacking THE IMBOZHWA ATTACK THE CAMP. 277 party had no success in trying to get Mpweto and Karembwe" to join them against us, or it would have been more serious still. November 24th.--The Imbozhwa, or Babemba rather, came early this morning, and called on Mobamad to come out of his stockade if he were a man who could fight; but the fence is now finished, and no one seems willing to obey the taunting call. I have nothing to do with it, but feel thankful that I was detained, and did not, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 214 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 390g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236672569
  • 9781236672568