Last Exit to Brooklyn
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Last Exit to Brooklyn

3.93 (17,751 ratings by Goodreads)
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Few novels have caused as much debate as Hubert Selby Jr.'s notorious masterpiece, Last Exit to Brooklyn, and this Penguin Modern Classics edition includes an introduction by Irvine Welsh, author of Trainspotting.Described by various reviewers as hellish and obscene, Last Exit to Brooklyn tells the stories of New Yorkers who at every turn confront the worst excesses in human nature. Yet there are moments of exquisite tenderness in these troubled lives. Georgette, the transvestite who falls in love with a callous hoodlum; Tralala, the conniving prostitute who plumbs the depths of sexual degradation; and Harry, the strike leader who hides his true desires behind a boorish masculinity, are unforgettable creations. Last Exit to Brooklyn was banned by British courts in 1967, a decision that was reversed the following year with the help of a number of writers and critics including Anthony Burgess and Frank Kermode. Hubert Selby, Jr. (1928-2004) was born in Brooklyn, New York. At the age of 15, he dropped out of school and went to sea with the merchant marines. While at sea he was diagnosed with lung disease. With no other way to make a living, he decided to try writing: 'I knew the alphabet. Maybe I could be a writer.' In 1964 he completed his first book, Last Exit to Brooklyn, which has since become a cult classic. In 1966, it was the subject of an obscenity trial in the UK. His other books include The Room, The Demon, Requiem for a Dream, The Willow Tree and Waiting Period. In 2000, Requiem for a Dream was adapted into a film starring Jared Leto and Ellen Burstyn, and directed by Darren Aronofsky.If you enjoyed Last Exit to Brooklyn, you might like Larry McMurty's The Last Picture Show, also available in Penguin Modern Classics.'Last Exit to Brooklyn will explode like a rusty hellish bombshell over America, and still be eagerly read in 100 years'Allen Ginsberg'An urgent tickertape from hell'Spectator
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Product details

  • Paperback | 272 pages
  • 128 x 196 x 20mm | 181.44g
  • Penguin Books Ltd
  • PENGUIN CLASSICS
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0141195657
  • 9780141195650
  • 15,841

Review quote

Selby's place is in the front rank of American novelists ... to understand his work is to understand the anguish of America * New York Times Book Review * An urgent tickertape from hell * Spectator * Selby deploys street slang, common speech, argot and scatology to create a high poetic art...it seems to derive from the greatest American poetry--Whitman, Pound, Williams, and Olson * The Nation *
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About Hubert Selby

Hubert Selby, Jr. was born in Brooklyn in 1928. At the age of 15, he dropped out of school and went to sea with the merchant marines. While at sea he was diagnosed with lung disease. With no other way to make a living, he decided to try writing: 'I knew the alphabet. Maybe I could be a writer.' In 1964 he completed his first book, Last Exit to Brooklyn, which has since become a cult classic. In 1966, it was the subject of an obscenity trial in the UK. His other books include The Room, The Demon, Requiem for a Dream, Song of the Silent Snow, The Willow Tree and Waiting Period. In 2000, Requiem for a Dream starred Jared Leto and Ellen Burstyn and was directed by Darren Aronofsky. Hubert Selby Jr died in Highland Park, Los Angeles, California in April 2004.
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Review Text

Selby's place is in the front rank of American novelists ... to understand his work is to understand the anguish of America New York Times Book Review
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Rating details

17,751 ratings
3.93 out of 5 stars
5 33% (5,931)
4 38% (6,660)
3 21% (3,688)
2 6% (1,038)
1 2% (434)

Our customer reviews

Selby has been described as a 'clinician of violence . whose novels have the immediacy of art' (Josephine Hendin, Vulnerable People: A View of American Fiction Since 1945 (A Galaxy book)), which I think is true; likewise, he is a literary master of demonstrating through his characters a moral ugliness, misogyny and despair whose power as a novelist is unmatched and unprecedented in fiction. He is a truly remarkable writer, and, while he wrote six novels in his lifetime, I believe the most powerful and compelling (while not the darkest), remains Last Exit. I cannot recommend it highly enough - it is a genuine work of art, but its power is dark and troubling, so I would likewise highly recommend you stay clear of this novel if you find yourself in a depressed frame of mind. Controversy has always surrounded Selby, Jr.'s writing. From the start, with Last Exit (being his first novel), his original UK publisher Calder and Boyers, faced prosecution in the UK in 1967, under the 1959 Obscene Publications Act. It was a major trial, especially because while it was originally found guilty of being 'obscene', the Appeal in 1968 overturned that decision and paved way for a much more open-minded interpretation of literature as to merit. In some interviews, and in one introduction to the novel that he wrote, Selby himself said that when he was writing this novel (six years in the making), he 'was aware of the rage and anger within' (quoted from the QPB edition in 1994). He also acknowledged that, while he has no favourite among his novels, he singles out The Room, and then this novel, notably, because through it he 'truly did learn how to write' (quote from same QPB edition). Set in New York in the late 1950s, the story grabs you from the start, conveying an incredibly raw, visceral, yet always disturbingly poetic quality throughout. It is superb for its genuine grittiness, horribly grim reality and ugliness of modern inner city life - of thought, attitude, action and feeling - both projected outwards, as well as internalised, all of which is captured through numerous voices of the dispossessed, alienated, disenfranchised. Selby is in the tradition of naturalist/realist fiction, but he goes a significant step further, in that, often through his first-person character narratives/viewpoints, he achieves an hallucinatory quality whose intensity strengthens the realities he conveys. One critic, James R. Giles, in his excellent study of Selby's works, Understanding Hubert Selby, Jr. (Understanding Contemporary American Literature), wrote 'It is true that, while all the characters in the novel are victimized by a brutal environment, they are guilty of moral failures that make their victimization complete and irrevocable', and this is done by Selby's exploring without fear or judgement powerful themes that resonant as much today as they did on first publication in 1964 in the US: drug addiction, misogyny, violence of rape and beatings, prostitution, the relentless drudgery and alienation of most jobs as well as unemployment, without value or meaning and life in general that is suffused with hate and a distressingly dark, twisted humour (when not expressed through seething resentment or explosive anger). I reckon, Dante would have regarded Last Exit as a worthy match to his own vision of Hell - especially through characters who represent the sick underbelly of the city: self-deluding, beaten-up prostitutes, incredibly violent youths and gangs, a desperately lonely, elderly woman who has no life other than pathetic memories of her dead husband and son, among others. As for disturbing, truly dark humour, one such example will give you a powerful sense of it: at one point, two women sitting chatting on a bench in a miserable New York housing project, joke about and look forward with sick, twisted glee to the prospect of a baby - crawling on an upper-storey tenement window-ledge - falling to its death: they're disappointed that it is saved in the nick of time). In particular, the lives of a handful of individuals are portrayed with great psychological depth, narrated most often from the first-person viewpoint, in a stream-of-consciousness fashion that remains clear, coherent and compelling. These viewpoints capture their desperation, self-loathing, hatred and confusion about themselves and their environments: defiant yet self-deluding Georgette, a hig drag queen who is pathetically in love with Vinnie and convinced she can change him for the better and that he will truly love her; while he himself is a psychopathic and sociopathic gang leader interested in only in sadistic and often instant gratification; Tralala, a violently angry, predatory prostitute who ultimately is destroyed in the most horrifying way imaginable; Harry - interestingly, that name is ubiquitous among male characters in Selby's fiction, acting as a synonym for the type of man who is misogynistic, dispossessed, angry, self-loathing, and self-deluding - who is a trade union leader, loathsome, selfish, arrogant and boring, who is despised or at best tolerated by his co-workers - and, worse, whose misogyny is so genuinely convincing and disturbing, which we hear, being ~inside his head', listening trapped to his banal voice, desperation, loathing and perspective, such that it makes Bateman's misogyny in American Psycho appear not only over the top, but utterly unreal (and never mind Ellis' darkly satirical intentions).show more
by bobbygw
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