Lasers in Chemistry

Lasers in Chemistry

4 (1 rating by Goodreads)
By (author)  , By (author) 

List price: US$64.95

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

The creative and growing use of lasers in chemistry related fields is an imperative issue that proves invaluable for analysis. Van Hecke and Karukstis' Lasers in Technology covers the major types of lasers (including semiconductor, solid state, and gas), as well as their relevant applications. Using specific case studies, LIC is appropriate for undergraduates in chemistry, as well as for professionals in medicine, communications, industry, and military systems needing practical reference data. Written by two experts in a clear and attractive manner, this second edition proves to be even more beneficial than before.
show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 360 pages
  • 224 x 284mm | 453.59g
  • Academic Press Inc
  • San Diego, United States
  • English
  • 2nd edition
  • 0127141510
  • 9780127141510

Review quote

"The writing style is very good. The authors have a relaxed approach to the material that makes the topics accessible to the readers..."
-Robert H. Lipson, University of Western Ontario

"...Not only easy reading but actually fun to read. Examples are well researched and presented in a way that makes them easily understandable. Figures are outstanding!...This book is a winner..."
-Hartmut G. Hedderich, Purdue University
show more

About Gerald R. Van Hecke

Dr. Gerald R. Van Hecke is Professor of Chemistry at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry in 1961 from Harvey Mudd College and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Physical Chemistry in 1963 and 1966 from Princeton University. Prior to his arrival at Harvey Mudd College in 1970, he was a Chemist at Shell Development in Emeryville, California. His research interests involve studies of liquid crystalline materials, from synthesis of new materials to their characterization bythermodynamic and spectral measurements. He also uses laser light scattering to measure thermodynamic properties of mixtures of simple liquids. He is co-author with Kerry K. Karukstis of A Student's Guide to Lasers in Chemistry, amonograph for undergraduates on the applications of lasers in chemistry. He is a member of the American Chemical Society, the International Liquid Crystal Society, the Council on Undergraduate Research, and Society of the Sigma Xi - The Scientific Research Society. His curricular initiatives have focused on introducing undergraduate applications of lasers in chemistry. Dr. Kerry K. Karukstis is Professor of Chemistry at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, California. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry in 1977 from Duke University and her Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 1981from Duke University. Prior to her arrival at Harvey Mudd College in 1984, she was a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Laboratory of Chemical Biodynamics at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research interests involve applications of absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy to surfactant assemblies (micelles, reverse micelles, vesicles, liposomes) and host-guest systems (cyclodextrins, dendrimers). She is co-author with Gerald R. Van Hecke of A Student's Guide to Lasers in Chemistry, a monograph for undergraduates on applications of lasers in chemistry. She is a member of the American Chemical Society, the American Society for Photobiology, the Biophysical Society, the Council on Undergraduate Research, Phi Beta Kappa, and Society of the Sigma Xi - The Scientific Research Society. She is also currently a Councilor for the Chemistry Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research. Her curricular initiatives have focused on two areas: introducing undergraduate applications of lasers in chemistry and incorporating biophysical applications and experiments in physical chemistry courses andlaboratories.
show more

Table of contents

Part 1. Introduction to the Laser Itself
1. Properties of Light and Lasers
2. What Makes the Laser Shine
3. How to Modify the Light Output of the Laser
4. Details of Several Common Lasers
Part 2. The Laser as a Probe
5. Ultrafast Chemical Processes
6. Multiphoton Spectroscopy; Single Photon Spectroscopy Is Not the Only Way
7. Lasers as Probes: Fluorescence Spectroscopy
8. Separation and Analysis of Mixtures Using Capillary Electrophoresis and Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection
9. Laser Light Scattering
10. Laser-Assisted Mass Spectrometry
11. Photoacoustic Thermal Characterization of Liquid Crystals
Part 3. The Laser as a Reagent
12. Laser Induced Chemical Reactions
13. Lasers in Industrial Chemical Processes
14. Laser Photons as Medicine
15. Laser-Induced Selective Bond Chemistry
show more

Rating details

1 ratings
4 out of 5 stars
5 0% (0)
4 100% (1)
3 0% (0)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X