Language

Language : An Introduction to the Study of Speech

3.83 (240 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

Speech is so familiar a feature of daily life that we rarely pause to define it. It seems as natural to man as walking, and only less so than breathing. Yet it needs but a moment's reflection to convince us that this naturalness of speech is but an illusory feeling. The process of acquiring speech is, in sober fact, an utterly different sort of thing from the process of learning to walk. In the case of the latter function, culture, in other words, the traditional body of social usage, is not seriously brought into play. The child is individually equipped, by the complex set of factors that we term biological heredity, to make all the needed muscular and nervous adjustments that result in walking. Indeed, the very conformation of these muscles and of the appropriate parts of the nervous system may be said to be primarily adapted to the movements made in walking and in similar activities. In a very real sense the normal human being is predestined to walk, not because his elders will assist him to learn the art, but because his organism is prepared from birth, or even from the moment of conception, to take on all those expenditures of nervous energy and all those muscular adaptations that result in walking. To put it concisely, walking is an inherent, biological function of man.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 278 pages
  • 152 x 229 x 15mm | 376g
  • Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1514321548
  • 9781514321546

Rating details

240 ratings
3.83 out of 5 stars
5 32% (76)
4 32% (76)
3 26% (63)
2 9% (22)
1 1% (3)
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