The Landmarks of Snake-Poison Literature; Being a Review of the More Important Researches Into the Nature of Snake-Poisons ...

The Landmarks of Snake-Poison Literature; Being a Review of the More Important Researches Into the Nature of Snake-Poisons ...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1886 edition. Excerpt: ...chapter. The fourth argument is most remarkable. Mr. Boag observes that a poisonous snake is I protected from the effects of its own poison, by its physical conformation, which enables the animal toI live with a very small amount of oxygen. Unfortunately for this argument, however, venomous and non-venomous snakes do not differ anatomically, and yet the venom of the former will kill the latter. Mr. Boag is also in error in stating that the poison is not generally fatal to cold-blooded animals. Although its action is, of course, somewhat slower, it is none the less fatal. I would not be understood to mean that deoxidation of the blood to some extent is not a result of cobra-poisoning; it certainly is, but it is the result of the action of the venom upon the respiratory centres, &c., in the medulla. The treatment Mr. Boag recommends is interesting. The principle is the speedy oxygenation of the system, and the means to this end are the following: _ " External treatment," which may be divided s"l"into local and general; first, suction of the Wound as recommended by Oelsus. This measure should not be omitted, though Mr. Boag does not think it is very successful. Mr. Boag evidently believed with Celsus that this proceeding can be adopted with perfect safety to the operator; but that it is not so, has been proved by Fayrer and others; undoubtedly, the risk is slight, but still it exists. Suction is, moreover, absolutely useless. The next measures are the ligature and scarifi-Ligatureand cation of the wound, which should then be washed m"fia"n' with a weak solution of lunar caustic and water, a. warm bath acidulated with nitric acid just sufli ciently to irritate the skin. This bath should be continued at...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236860020
  • 9781236860026