The Land That Thyme Forgot

The Land That Thyme Forgot

3.75 (24 ratings by Goodreads)
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Description

In the spirit of Al Dente, "The Land That Thyme Forgot" will describe the intrepid gastronome's search for the heart and soul of Britain through the food we eat. William Black talks to producers, restaurateurs, visits the great and the awful, and seeks out the country's disappearing specialities - tripe, Singing Hinnies, solomongundy, Hindle wakes, Sussex Pond pudding and flummery. Great names, but who on earth still eats, let alone cooks, them? Britain has a very rich culinary tradition though it is only now that we seem ready to reclaim it. Our meat can be among the best, and the worst. The quality of our cheeses has improved exponentially over the past few years. Farmer's markets are thriving. Our restaurant culture is burgeoning, and we have almost got over those ancient Puritan diktats that pleasure is somehow just not what life is all about. So, perhaps even if we have been a little forgotten in the league of culinary greats, times really are a-changing. William goes in search of lobscouse in Liverpool, finds salmon in the Severn and cheddar in, well, Cheddar. This journey through the lost traditions of British cuisine is never less than fascinating. Prepare to be amazed ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 400 pages
  • 126 x 196 x 28mm | 281.23g
  • Transworld Publishers Ltd
  • Corgi Books
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 0552152099
  • 9780552152099
  • 1,737,292

Review quote

"'A fascinating tour round our food roots... An edible H.V. Morton - I loved it and so will you' " -- Clarissa Dickson Wright "'William Black's book confirms my long-held belief that British food has a history to match any other cuisine in the world. Tragically, we've almost entirely lost touch with this heritage, but this book is a heroic step in the right direction' " -- Antony Worrall Thompson "'The food world's answer to Bill Bryson'" Yorkshire Post "'Black's history is fascinating to any reader...provides new insight into Britain's love/hate affair with food'" Waterstone's Books Quarterly "'He delights in the overlooked and the downright unfashionable...if you've ever wondered what exactly is clapshot, or cockaleekie, or cullen skink, then this is a book for you'" Eastern Daily Pressshow more

Flap copy

A gastronomic journey around Britain and Ireland. In the spirit of Al Dente, The Land that Thyme Forgot describes the intrepid gastronome's search for the heart and soul of Britain through the food we eat. Talking to producers and restaurateurs, visiting the great and the awful, seeking out Britain's disappearing specialities -- tripe, Singing Hinnies, Solomongundy, Hindle wakes, Sussex Pond pudding and Flummery. Great names, but who on earth still eats, let alone cooks them? Britain is a country with a rich tradition. Its meat can be among the best, and the worst. The quality of its cheeses has improved exponentially over the past few years. Farmer's markets are thriving and restaurant culture is burgeoning. So, perhaps even if Britain has been a little forgotten in the league of culinary greats, times really are a-changing. From boiling vegetables in Sussex, to herrings in Kent, yellowman toffee in Derry, smokies in Scotland, Cornish pasties in Cornwall and clotted cream in Devon, William Black takes us on a journey of food and cooking to explain what Britain eats and why.show more

About William Black

William Black is the author of Al Dente and the co-author with Sophie Grigson of several bestselling books: Fish, Organic and Travels a la Carte. He was the winner of the Glenfiddich award for his television programme Matters of Taste and he has sourced ingredients (fish in particular) for many of the UK's finest restaurants. He lives in Oxfordshire.show more

Review Text

"'He delights in the overlooked and the downright unfashionable...if you've ever wondered what exactly is clapshot, or cockaleekie, or cullen skink, then this is a book for you'"show more

Back cover copy

'A fascinating tour round our food roots... I loved it and so will you' Clarissa Dickson Wright Singing Hinnies, tripe, solomongundy, Hindle Wakes, Sussex Pond Pudding and flummery. Great names, but who on earth still eats, let alone cooks, them?On a journey the length and breadth of the British Isles William Black talks to chefs, restaurateurs and producers, visits the great and the awful, and seeks out the country's disappearing specialities - searching for the heart and soul of Britain through the food we eat, reclaiming our very rich culinary tradition. William goes in search of Hindle Wakes in Lancashire, Fat Rascals in Yorkshire, and Double Gloucester in, well, Gloucester.His perambulations through the lost traditions of British cuisine are never less than fascinating. Prepare to be amazed . . .show more

Rating details

24 ratings
3.75 out of 5 stars
5 21% (5)
4 42% (10)
3 29% (7)
2 8% (2)
1 0% (0)
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