Land Survey and Land Titles; A Book for Boys and Girls, a Reference Volume for Property Owners, a Text for Students in the Laws of Elementary Principles, Respecting the Division of Our Land and the Laws Relating to Its Ownership

Land Survey and Land Titles; A Book for Boys and Girls, a Reference Volume for Property Owners, a Text for Students in the Laws of Elementary Principles, Respecting the Division of Our Land and the Laws Relating to Its Ownership

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1914 edition. Excerpt: ...one part of the coun Sad tTy t0 the other-The building of the Illinois Central Railroad was thus made possible, this company securing all even numbered sections for a distance of nine miles on each side of its road. And if any of these sections had been previously homesteaded or entered by some one, the company could select lands equivalent for a further distance of six miles. The construction of the Union Pacific Eailroad across the vast western plain was made possible by this liberal assistance. Many other roads have been thus assisted. Having so much land given them, but always in alternate sections, they, the railroads, could sell the same and derive funds to assist in building the road and at the same time the road would help settlers move into the new country and develop it. Congress has also from time to time made liberal grants of land to individuals for some specific service rendered, usually of a military nature in defense of outposts; or for the more offensive work, that of exploration and discovery into the unsettled and newer parts of our territory. Thus will be found many private grants throughout the United States, and these being surveyed and allotted prior to establishing the common rectangular system of survey, remain visible to the present day. They grants6 were usually surveyed irrespective of any definite direction and their boundary lines extended in any direction of the compass. When the later survey of townships and sections is made these old private surveys remain and their lines cut the meridians and parallels at any angle. This is noted in the map of Illinois where the "four o'clock meridian" runs diagonally across the southeastern portion of the state marking one side of the Harrison Purchase. As indicated...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236553004
  • 9781236553003