The Lancet London; A Journal of British and Foreign Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Physiology, Chemistry, Pharmacology, Public Health and News

The Lancet London; A Journal of British and Foreign Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, Physiology, Chemistry, Pharmacology, Public Health and News

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...like tar, and the lodgment of the black secretion in the intestinal canal appears to be productive of great mischief to the system. Calomel and a Mack draught may be exhibited every now and then, but a patient cannot take them from day to day. Sometimes the romp. ext. colocynth will be sufficient, but simple purgatives often fail. The pills which I am about to mention I have found to be convenient in cases of this kind. Two scruples and a half of comp. ext. colocynth; half a scruple of soap; one drop of croton oil. Let these be well rubbed up and carefully mixed, and divided into a dozen pills, one or two of which may be taken every night or every other night when wanted. These are excellent pills; they cause nothing like the inconvenience produced by large doses of croton oil, and are very efficient indeed. The disease is very probably quite incurable, and it does not matter what medicine you give the patient. But still every now and then the progress of the disease is stopped, and the patient gets very well again. The treatment which I have found to be most successful, and under which I have seen the greatest benefit arise is, a grain of zinc made into a pill and given three times a day, and then a draught of twenty minims of tincture of cantbarides to wash it down. If you dissolve the sulphate of zinc in the draught it makes it nauseous, --you may as well give ink. After a time the sulphate of zinc may be increased, and if you please you may carry it up to five or six grains; but 1 do not advise you to do it, for if yon increase it to a certain point it makes the patient sick, and you cannot induce him to take it afterwards. It is from the continued use of the zinc, and not from the exhibition of large quantities that benefit is to be derived...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 726 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 37mm | 1,275g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236513630
  • 9781236513632