The Lakes and Gulf Waterway; As Related to the Chicago Sanitary Problem. the General Project of a Waterway from Lake Michigan to the Gulf of Mexico ... a Preliminary Report with Appendices, Maps and Profiles

The Lakes and Gulf Waterway; As Related to the Chicago Sanitary Problem. the General Project of a Waterway from Lake Michigan to the Gulf of Mexico ... a Preliminary Report with Appendices, Maps and Profiles

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1891 edition. Excerpt: ... of 1867 followed the great rise of 1867, the two most notable floods of recent times, and both ice.gorge rises. In the report upon the survey of 1883, Major Benyaurd says: --"The oscillation between high and low water is about fifteen feet, though a hight of twentythree feet has been recorded, occasioned by an ice gorge." (Report, Chief of Engineers, 1884, p. 1958. et seq). Mr. Wisner reports: --"The zeros of all these gauges water gauges were established at ten points were connected with all the high and low watermarks to be found along the valley." "From an examination of high water marks, it was found that in several places where the river had been gorged with ice, the surface rose to twenty-three feet above the low water plane, but ordinary high water, probably in no case, exceeds fifteen feet above low stage." It might be said that the report of 1883 illustrates how difficulties, which become insurmountable obstacles in the report of 1890, vanish before those seeking a practical solution. The following tables illustrate the serious errors into which the report has fallen, respecting flood heights: --High Waters At Morris, Illinois. The following table of notable hitch waters at Ottawa illustrates the uncertain elevations of the spring break-up rises. Hum Waters At Ottawa. Illinois. corrected by 0.6 feet for each 1000 feet above dam. The high water of 1883 would then have an apparent volume of 57,000 cubic feet, or 61,000 if corrected for velocity of approach, and the summer rise of 1869, 47,000 cubic feet. From the report are deduced the following elevations at the Douglas farm, 2f miles below the dam, which are significant: --1867, ice gorge, mark indefinite, elevation 0.3 feet above crest of dam (?) ice...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236811496
  • 9781236811493