Laboratory Outlines for General Botany; For the Elementary Study of Plant Structures and Functions from the Standpoint of Evolution

Laboratory Outlines for General Botany; For the Elementary Study of Plant Structures and Functions from the Standpoint of Evolution

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ...prepared slides are at hand draw a section of a stamen, showing the one-celled microspores. 5. Draw a section of' a male gametophyte, showing the large tube cell and nucleus, the generative cell and the two disorganized vegetative cells lying like two thin plates against the wall of the grain back of the generative cell. 6. Draw a section of a young ovule, showing the functional megaspore. 7. Draw a pollen-grain which has formed a short pollen-tube growing down into the nucellus (tip of the megasporangium). Note the tube nucleus in the tube and in the body of the grain the spermatogenous cell, the stalk cell and the remains of the two evanescent vegetative cells. The spermatogenous cell divides latter into two sperm cells which do not have flagella or cilia. From the same section draw the spherical embryonic female gametophyte. 8. Draw a female gametophyte showing archegonia (ovaries) with ospheres. 9. Draw an archegonium (ovary) in which the nucleus of the oosphere has divided into four nuclei. 10. Draw the upper part of a female gametophyte, showing remains of archegonia with an elongated cavity below them in which appear a number of embryos in various stages of development. Only one of these embryos survives, probably the one which has a slight advantage in size, ' vigor, and food supply. Note the struggle for existence which must go on among these embryos. 11. Sketch a mature seed, showing the wing. Let a winged seed drop to the floor from a height of six or seven feet and note how it falls. Describe the.adaptation this seed has for dissemination. Note also the readiness with which the seed is separated from the wing. Of what use is this adaptation? Plant seeds of Pinus and Thrlja occidentfzlis and use fresh plantlets or preserve in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 60 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236798759
  • 9781236798756