A Laboratory Chemistry

A Laboratory Chemistry

By (author) 

List price: US$3.96

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1904 edition. Excerpt: ...the relative weights of one molecule of each gas. From his results in chapters XII. and XIII., the student should calculate the number of times heavier a litre of oxygen is than a litre of hydrogen. The' figure representing the ratio between the weights of a certain volume of any gas and the same volume of hydrogen, taken as unity, the temperature and pressure being the same, is called the density of that gas. Now, a study of the facts indicates that the molecules of nearly all elementary gases, like hydrogen and oxygen, contain under normal conditions two atoms in the molecule, hence, if the density of a gas compared with hydrogen gives the ratio between the weights of the individual molecules, since each molecule contains two atoms, it will also give the ratio between the weights of the atoms of the two gases. If one litre of oxygen weighs sixteen times as much as a litre of hydrogen; one atom of oxygen will weigh sixteen times as much as an atom of hydrogen. This ratio between the weights of any atom and the hydrogen atom, which is taken as the standard and counted as unity, is called the atomic weight of the element. On the other hand, the ratio that exists between the weight of any gaseous molecule and a hydrogen atom is termed the molecular weight of that gas. It follows, therefore, that in all cases where the element has two atoms to the molecule the molecular weight is double the atomic weight. From the above, it is evident that the figure which represents the density of any elementary gas represents also the atomic weight, but this is true only so long as the elementary gas contains two atoms to the molecule. If it were to contain more or less, although the ratio between the weight of the molecule of the gas and the hydrogen...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 30 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 73g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236933621
  • 9781236933621