Kodakery Volume 5

Kodakery Volume 5

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ...What is needed is a distinct record of only a few of the multitudes of snowflakes that are falling. By using the largest stop on a rectilinear or anastigmat lens, when a 2% x 4% or larger folding focusing camera is used, and focusing on a point that is 25 feet or less from the camera the only snowflakes that will be in sharp focus will be those that are within a distance of a few feet from the point on which the lens is focused. All the other snowflakes will be so much out of focus that, owing to their small size and movement, they will make little or no perceptible impression on the film during alrto second exposure, while a photographic record will often be obtained, when the light is good, of those snowflakes that are within the field of sharp focus, provided they are outlined against a dark background. Made with No. 8A Folding Kodak, by O. F. Beams. 530 sec.; stop, 1; at 4 P. M.; in strong light. Fig. 1 of our illustration was made during a heavy snowstorm. The reason why no falling snowflakes were recorded is that the focus was set for 100 feet and a 1/10 second exposure given through stop f.8. The snowflakes were small and the exposure was so long that enough light reached the film from every point in the field of view for recording the images of the stationary objects after the snowflakes had passed those points. In Fig. 2 we find plenty of snowflake images within the plane of sharp focus, outlined against the dark parts of the background, but none are shown outlined against the sky because we cannot obtain a photographic image of a snowflake against a background of other snowflakes. None of the falling flakes are sharply rendered. The wind was blowing and the snowflakes were flying too fast for a V.-.0 second exposure to arrest...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 32 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 77g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236864409
  • 9781236864406