Kinks for the Builder, a Series of Methods and Short Cuts Relating to House Construction Contributed by Men Engaged in the Building Business

Kinks for the Builder, a Series of Methods and Short Cuts Relating to House Construction Contributed by Men Engaged in the Building Business

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...between this length and the nearest (longer) commercial length determines waste due to cutting. For labor allow 1000 ft. 13. M. for 2 carpenters and 1 laborer. Use six 20d. nails per lineal foot, for each piece of material. " To determine strength for carrying loads use the following coefficients, nominal depths in each case: 4 in., 15,000; 6 in., 36,300; 8 in., 64,100; 10 in., 103,000; 12 in., 151,500. Multiply the total load per foot wide uniformly distributed, by the span in feet, to get the proper strength coefficient. Example.--Live load 40 lb. per sq. ft. Estimate the weight of the flooring (dead load) at 13 lb. per sq. ft. The total load = 40----13 = 53 lb. peh sq. ft. Span = 16 ft. W=53X16=848lb. Coefficient = 848 X 16 = 13,568. In the table the coefficient nearest this is that for the 4-in. nominal depth. The weight per sq. ft. of floor was on the basis of a 6-in. (nominal) thickness, so the load may be reduced. This gives 2/3 X 13 = 8 lb. (practically), so the total load = 48 lb. per sq. ft., or 768 lb. on the span of 16 ft., one ft. wide. Before deciding that the 4-in. thickness can be used the safe load must be found that the floor can carry without the pieces splitting along the middle. This would be a failure in shear. The fiber stress used in computing the strength coefficients was 1300 lb. per sq. in. (long leaf yellow pine), and the safe shearing stress = 1300-: --10 = 130 lb. per sq. in. The width must be multiplied by the actual depth; the product by the safe shearing stress and this product by 1 1/3. That is Safe load in shear = 1 1/3 X 12 X 3.625 X 130 = 755 lb. uniformly distributed. This is close to the actual weight carried, but it is best to use a deeper piece. Using a 6-in. thickness (nominal) the total load...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236842340
  • 9781236842343