King's Complete History of the World War; 1914-1918. Europe's War with Bolshevism 1919-1920. War of the Turkish Partition 1920-1921. Warfare in Ireland, India, Egypt, Far East 1916-1921. Epochal Events Thruout the Civilized World from

King's Complete History of the World War; 1914-1918. Europe's War with Bolshevism 1919-1920. War of the Turkish Partition 1920-1921. Warfare in Ireland, India, Egypt, Far East 1916-1921. Epochal Events Thruout the Civilized World from

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...Montello and San Dona di Piave. Their common objective was Venice, with its great arsenal, the strategic key that would unlock all the doors of Italy. The Battle of Brenta River Gen. Von Hoetzendorff's group of Austrian armies advanced along the Asiago Plateau in two columns, one on the east, the other on the west bank of the Brenta River. The Italian line east of the river was held by Gen. Giordano's 4th Army, while the line west of the river was held by Gen. PecoriGiraldo's 1st Army, comprising the Italian 12th Division, the British 48th, the British 23d and the left wing of the French 12th Army Corps. It was west of the Brenta that the invaders made their first thrust. Four Austrian divisions struck at the center of Gen. PecoriGiraldo's line, pressing back the British 48th Division half a mile on a front of two miles. The rest of the Italian line held and the four Austrian divisions in advance found themselves caught in a dangerous pocket or salient. Meanwhile the attack on the east side of the Brenta had been checked. The Austrians did, indeed, reach the Col Moschin, on the very edge of the hills, but they were forced to withdraw. On the next day, the British 48th Division drove the Austrians in disorder out of the salient they had made, taking 1,000 prisoners and 72 machine guns. The French and Italian divisions on either flank also recovered the ground they had lost on the previous day. Von Hoetzendorff's offensive had signally failed. Though he had numerous divisions in reserve, he dared not resume the attack. The battle of the Brenta had ended in a repulse for the Austrians. The Battle of Montello THE second group of Austrian armies, under Gen. Boroevitch, meanwhile, had been more successful in their offensive along the line of the lower...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 580 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 30mm | 1,021g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236520904
  • 9781236520906