The Kingdom of Christ; Delineated, in Two Essays on Our Lord's Own Accout of His Person and of the Nature of His Kingdom, and on the Constitution, Powers, and Ministry of a Christian Church, as Appointed by Himself

The Kingdom of Christ; Delineated, in Two Essays on Our Lord's Own Accout of His Person and of the Nature of His Kingdom, and on the Constitution, Powers, and Ministry of a Christian Church, as Appointed by Himself

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ... these were to be at variance (as in many points they probably would be) with the decisions and practices of our own Church; we should be no more bound to acquiesce in and adopt the decision of that majority, even in matters which we do not regard as essential to the Christian Faith, than we should be, to pass a law for this realm, because it was approved by the majority of the human race."1 Many persons are accustomed to speak as if No natua majority had some natural inherent right to inarMa-S control and to represent the whole of any ionty' 'Essays, 4th Series, pp. 166--171. Assembly or Class of persons." We are told of this or that being "held by most of the early Fathers;"--of the opinions or practices of " the greater part of the members of the early Church;"--of the "decision of the majority of" such and such a Council, &c. No doubt, when other points are equal, the judgment of a greater number deserves more consideration than that of a less; but a majority has no such controlling or representing power, except by express, arbitrary, regulation and enactment; and regulations as to this point differ in different cases. Thus, the decision of a Jury, in England, is their unanimous decision; in Scotland, that of two-thirds; a decision of the House of Peers, is that of a majority of those who are (personally, or by Proxy) present;--of the House of Commons, --of a majority in a House of not less than forty; &c. And when there is no express enactment or agreement on this point, nothing can fairly be called an opinion or decision of such and such persons, except one in which they ail concur. When they do not, we then look, not merely to the numbers, but also to the characters and circumstances of each...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236505905
  • 9781236505903