The Kentucky Law Reporter; A Monthly Magazine, Devoted to the Interests of the Legal Profession at Large and Particularly of the Kentucky Bar Volume 21, PT. 1

The Kentucky Law Reporter; A Monthly Magazine, Devoted to the Interests of the Legal Profession at Large and Particularly of the Kentucky Bar Volume 21, PT. 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...per month. It is always in the power of the chancellor. if the conditions change, to change the amount of alimony to conform to the necessities of the case, and it is. therefore, unnecessary for us to make any orders in this direction. It appears from the testimony in the case that the claim of appellant, that he is deprived of the pleasure of enjoying the society of his infant daughter, is wholly unsupported.by the proof. For reasons indicated the judgment overruling the motion to set aside the judgment allowing alimony is affirmed. GEORGE, &o., COMMISSIONERS v. LILLARD, WARDEN. (Filed June 13, 1899.) Constitutional iaw--Parole law--Construction of statutes--'1'he act of May 2, 1888. known as the " Parole Law," was not repealed by the enactment of the law of 1898 to create a board of penitentiary commissioners, as the parole law is not referred to in any way in said act Repeals by implication are not favored. The board of penitentiary commissioners have no power to parole a prisoner under the law. and that power is vested in the commissioners of the sinking fund. Said law is not in violation of section 77 of the Constitution because a parole is not a commutation of a sentence, a reprieve or a pardon. Nor does said law violate section 253 of the Constitution, which directs that convicts shall be confined at labor within the walls. as it was intended to prevent working convicts without the walls, and this law was in force at the time the present Constitution was framed, and had it been the intention to prevent the passagelof such laws it would have prohibited the legislature from enacting same. The questions here involved are: lst. Is the act known as the "Parole Law" still in force. If so, is it to be executed by...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 512 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 26mm | 903g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236855205
  • 9781236855206