Kemlo's Watch-Repairer's Handbook; Being a Complete Guide to the Young Beginner in Taking Apart, Putting Together, and Thoroughly Cleaning the English

Kemlo's Watch-Repairer's Handbook; Being a Complete Guide to the Young Beginner in Taking Apart, Putting Together, and Thoroughly Cleaning the English

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...the barrel. This, of course, cannot do otherwise than make the chain run to its place. TO TIGHTEN A CANNON PINION ON THE CENTER ARBOR. Roll the arbor between two files, letting the square part be to one side of them, of course. A very slight roll between two files will generally tighten the cannon, and there can be no danger of bending the arbor or setting the pinions to one side. TO TIGHTEN A RUBY PIN. Set the ruby pin in asphaltum varnish. It will become hard in a few minutes, and be much firmer and better than gum shellac, as generally used. ON MENDING WATCH TRAINS. When a wheel or a pinion is wanting in the train of a watch, it is usual to say the train is broken; and the act of supplying that wheel or pinion is generally termed mending the train. This, according to the old plan of working, involved no small amount of labor, in the way of calculations, to get the proper size of the new piece. A person was under the necessity of being a good algebra scholar to do it. The recent, or I might say, the American system--for European watchmakers still hold to their old ways, --makes it much easier. A few simple tables have been gotten up by which any person who knows how to count and to measure may select the piece he wants in a few minutes. TO DETERMINE THE REQUIRED DIAMETER OF A PINION. 64 I 60 I 8 I 64 I 8 I 60 I 15 I 7 I 300 Trial Watch. 80 I 75 I 10 I 80 I 10 I 60 I 15 I 8 I 300 No part of his trade gives the self-instructed watchmaker more trouble than the acquirement of an ability to temper, as they should be, his various tools and pieces of machinery; in fact a whole life devoted to experiments and study touching this department, would not be likely to attain the desired end. And yet all the processes employed are so amazingly simple as to..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236504763
  • 9781236504760