The Juvenile Expositor; Or. Sequel to the Common Spelling-Book Containing a Collection of the Most Useful Words in the English Language, Clearly Explained, and Adapted to the Comprehension of Young Persons Being an Introduction to

The Juvenile Expositor; Or. Sequel to the Common Spelling-Book Containing a Collection of the Most Useful Words in the English Language, Clearly Explained, and Adapted to the Comprehension of Young Persons Being an Introduction to

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1810 edition. Excerpt: ... and a half. In R hot weather, or hot climates, the clouds, being more rarefied, are lighter, and ascend much higher than they do in colder climates, or colder weather: and indeed, in coM weather, the clouds frequentiytouch the very surface of the earth; for a fog may with propriety be called a cloud close to the ground. A mist is an incipient formation of clouds, or haziness; and often denotes a very small rain, or deposition of watt in particles so small as not to b'e visible singly. The snow is formed when Hie atmosphere is so cold as to freeze the particles of rain as soon as they are formed, and the adherence of several of those particles to each other, which meet and cling to each other as they descend through the air, form the usual fleeces of snow, which are larger, when the clouds are higher than when they are lower. The hail differs from snow in its consisting of much more solid, and more defined pieces of congealed water. The phenomena of dew and hoar-frost seem to proceed from a quantity of aqueous and undecomposed vapour which always exists in the atmosphere; and which, being raised by mere heat, is condensed by mere cold, without undergoing that process by which water is changed into air. If thf cold be very intense, hoar-frost appears instead of dew; which is nothing more than the dew frozen after it falls upon the ground. Lightning is found to be a flash, produced by the electrical fluid rushing from one part into another; and tAtcnWe?-the sound of the rushing torrent, reverberated among the clouds. The aurora iorealis, or northern dawn, is likewise an electrical phenomenon. It is a lambent or flashing light seen at night in some periods more often than in others, especially about the poles. The fiery6a/ls, which are seen shooting...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 122 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 7mm | 231g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236656385
  • 9781236656384