The Judges of England; With Sketches of Their Lives, and Miscellaneous Notices Connected with the Courts at Westminster, from the Time of the Conquest Volume 6

The Judges of England; With Sketches of Their Lives, and Miscellaneous Notices Connected with the Courts at Westminster, from the Time of the Conquest Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1857 edition. Excerpt: ...in chancery and knighted; and Francis, his third son, became a baron of the Exchequer, and will be noticed in the reign of Charles II.1 1 Whitelocke, 108. 234. 237. 240. 245. Fuller's Worthies i. 349. 'Morant's Essex, ii. 73. 4 See Vol. IV. p. 141. BREREWOOD, ROBERT. Juot. K. B. 1644. The family of Brerewood were flourishing citizens of Chester, many of them enjoying the municipal honours of that ancient city. The judge's grandfather is called a wet-glover there, and was thrice mayor. His uncle, Edward, was a famous scholar, and became the first Gresham professor of astronomy. His father, John, who was the mayor's eldest son, was sheriff of Chester; and the judge himself was born there about 1588. He was admitted into Brazenose College, Oxford, in 1605; and two years afterwards became a member of the Middle Temple; where, after somewhat more than the usual seven years' probation, he was called to the bar on November 13, 1615. After a lengthened practice of two-and-twenty years, during which he published several of his uncle's works, he was appointed a judge of North Wales in 1637; was chosen reader to his inn in the Lent following, and at Easter, 1639, was elected recorder of his native city. The degree of the coif was conferred upon him in 1640, and in Hilary Term, 1641, he was made king's serjeant. Receiving the honour of knighthood in December, 1643, he was advanced to the bench on the 31st of the next month, and was sworn into office at Oxford on February 6.2 The exercise of Sir Robert's j udicial functions were, however, of short continuance, and were never exercised in Westminster Hall. 1 Tbe incidents In this memoir, for which no other authority is cited, are derived from Bram&ton's Autobiography. Middle Temple Books; Dugdale's Orig....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 160 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236540816
  • 9781236540812