Journalism; Explains the Workings of a Modern Newspaper Office, and Gives Full Directions for Those Who Desire to Enter the Field of Journalism

Journalism; Explains the Workings of a Modern Newspaper Office, and Gives Full Directions for Those Who Desire to Enter the Field of Journalism

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1910 edition. Excerpt: ...of burning oil or chemicals, or any other cause, the fire becomes uncontrollable and assumes the aspect of a conflagration. The journalist should be on the alert to seize upon such occurrences to add graphic interest and value to his story, giving the details in full in the first part of his report, when he will find that they will be emphasized in the headlines by the city editor or copy reader. Several years ago the thrilling exploit of Chief Egan of the Boston Fire Department, in effecting his escape from a burning building by means of a slender telegraph wire, was considered by the Boston press to be worth columns of forcible, dramatic writing. Every detail of his perilous journey from the roof to the centre of the street, where he hung high over the heads of the awestricken multitude, and from which dangerous position he was released only through much difficulty and when almost exhausted, was vividly described. It is such incidents as this that test the perceptive and descriptive powers of the wideawake reporter to their utmost. The work is not without danger. Armed with a fire badge, the journalist is free to enter the fire lines, interview the police, the firemen, the owners of the property and others concerned, and view the destruction at close range. In his devotion to his profession and zeal for the particular paper he represents he often takes his life into his hands, and the records of the press contain at least one instance of a reporter who perished in the line of duty at a fire. In many large newspaper offices each reporter is responsible only for fires rung in from the boxes of a particular district. As the number comes in on the tapper, which is an important adjunct of every metropolitan local room, the reporter whose territory...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 36 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 82g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236680324
  • 9781236680327