Journal of a Three Years' Residence in Abyssinia, in Furtherance of the Objects of the Church Missionary Society; To Which Is Prefixed a Brief History of the Church of Abyssinia by Prof. Lee

Journal of a Three Years' Residence in Abyssinia, in Furtherance of the Objects of the Church Missionary Society; To Which Is Prefixed a Brief History of the Church of Abyssinia by Prof. Lee

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1834 edition. Excerpt: ...Achaber, whom they took prisoner. To-day he is put in chains, with some of the leading men of the city; who did not go out of their houses yesterday, and who are guilty of no other crime than that of having so little property and money in their houses; all that they did not absolutely want having been, for some time past, shut up in the churches. There are seven or eight persons killed, and many wounded: when Achaber was taken, his people fled, and the other party began plundering the city. As I live on a bill, in a secluded quarter where there are only some poor people's houses, the robbers did not come to my house. This morning the plundering had not ended, and the great people of the city were seen running through the streets with only an THE POWER OF THE ANATHEMA. 177 old rag round the middle of the body. It is supposed that to-day the soldiers will leave, with the mules and asses which they have stolen, laden with the things which they have seized, to go and share the booty with Mariam; who desires nothing better, although Gondar is under his jurisdiction, and Achaber his friend. It is also believed that, as is commonly the case, he will have the prisoners beaten, to extort money. The worst character that can be given to a prince is attributed to Mariam. He does justice to no one. When one of his soldiers robs or kills his companion, far from punishing him, he praises him before all, as a man of courage. It is said, that he has given orders to all his soldiers, on entering into Oubea's territories, to kill every human being that they find, without distinction of age or sex; that if one of his soldiers is known to have spared a single person in his power, he shall be punished with death. Evening.--At noon, the King and the Etchegua...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236669886
  • 9781236669889