A Journal; Comprising an Account of the Loss of the Brig Commerce of Hartford (Con.), James Riley, Master, Upon the Western Coast of Africa, August 26, 1815 Also of the Slavery and Sufferings of the Author and the Rest of the Crew Upon

A Journal; Comprising an Account of the Loss of the Brig Commerce of Hartford (Con.), James Riley, Master, Upon the Western Coast of Africa, August 26, 1815 Also of the Slavery and Sufferings of the Author and the Rest of the Crew Upon

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1836 edition. Excerpt: ...them off, if possible, till those drinking are satisfied. This is done with very great difficulty. After the camels are sufficiently watered, they are sent to browse. The natives never bring their tents to a well, leaving them behind in the keeping of the women. I now had as much water as I wanted; and can say, that it was the first time my thirst was thoroughly quenched, since I became a slave toGanus. The tents must have been as many as fifty miles back in the desert; for they always remain where they are left, when the owner goes in search of water, until he returns. We slept this night under a large bush with a large company, and kept a fire for the most part of the nignt. Upon the 5th, early in the morning, the camels were all watered again, as they are some- times compelled to go entirely without it for twenty days, and sometimes for a longer period. My master Ganus expressed great anxiety that my short trowsers should be washed; and told me to take them off. This left my body entirely naked, excepting that part of it which was covered with the American flag, and which he did not attempt to compel me to strike. They were hung upon a camel to dry, and this was the last time I ever saw them, or Muckwoola and Ishir, who carried them off with them. I was now taken on to a camel behind my master, who, in company with another Arab, went off full trot to the southward. Before noon, we met numbers of the natives who had fresh fish with them. We obtained a breakfast of them. By the middle of the afternoon, we came to the edge of an high precipice, limiting a considerable bay, a little to the north of Cape Mirik. We descended to the beach, at the head of the bay, which had in it a number of sand islands. The tide was now out, leaving it dry, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 68 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 141g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236665236
  • 9781236665232