Joseph E. Austrian's Digest of Business Statistics; A Comprehensive, Concise and Practical Compilation, Specially Prepared for the Use of Sales and Advertising Executives; Based on the Findings of the Census of 1920 and on Data Derived

Joseph E. Austrian's Digest of Business Statistics; A Comprehensive, Concise and Practical Compilation, Specially Prepared for the Use of Sales and Advertising Executives; Based on the Findings of the Census of 1920 and on Data Derived

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...districts containing individual cities having 200,000 inhabitants or more, distinguishing the population living within the city proper from that outside the city. The total population of each city with all its "adjacent territory" is also shown. The 29 metropolitan districts comprise 32 central cities and their suburban territory, there being 3 districts each of which includes 2 cities so large that both together are treated as constituting the urban center of the district. These cities are Minneapolis and St. Paul; Kansas City, Kans., and Kansas City, Mo.; and San Francisco and Oakland. Two cities having more than 200,000 inhabitants each--Newark and Jersey City--do not appear separately in the table, being included within the metropolitan district of New York. The importance of the suburbs of great cities is brought out clearly by the combined statistics for the 29 metropolitan districts, which appear at the beginning of the table. It will be seen that the population of these suburbs in 1920 constituted nearly one-fourth of the entire population of the districts. Moreover, during the 10-year period 1910-1920 the rate of increase in the population of the suburban areas was considerably greater than the corresponding rate for the central cities. In addition to the population of the 29 metropolitan districts themselves, the census returns for 1920 show an aggregate population of 949,961 residing in territory adjacent to the central cities but not included in the metropolitan districts--that is, in civil divisions which lie wholly or in greater part within 10 miles of the boundaries of the central cities, but in which the density of population was not sufficient to justify treating them as strictly urban. The total population...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236921860
  • 9781236921864