The Jewish Encyclopedia; A Descriptive Record of the History, Religion, Literature, and Customs of the Jewish People from the Earliest Times to the Present Day Volume 9

The Jewish Encyclopedia; A Descriptive Record of the History, Religion, Literature, and Customs of the Jewish People from the Earliest Times to the Present Day Volume 9

By (author) 

List price: US$17.46

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ... 130 pupils, and 120 Jewish children attend the city school, which has a total of 420 pupils. The charitable institutions include a Jewish hospital, a dispensary, etc. According to the handbook of the government of Volhynia for 1904, Novgorod-Volhynsk has one synagogue and twenty-two houses of prayer. NOVOGRUDOK: Russian town in the government of Minsk. The first mention of Jews in connection with Novogrudok dates back to 1484, when King Casimir Jagellon leased the customs duties of the place to Ilia Moiseyevich, Rubim Sakovich, Avram Danilovich, and Eska Shelemovich, Jews of Troki. Novogrudok is next mentioned in two doc 'uments of the year 1529. On Jan. 21 of that year the Jews there were made subject, with those of other Lithuanian towns, to the payment of a special military tax. On March 4, in the same year, King Sigismund ordered the waywode of Novogrudok to render all necessary aid to the farmer of taxes Michael Jesofovich in the collection of customs duties throughout the waywodeship. In a document of Nov. 27, 1551, Novogrudok is mentioned among the cities which were exempted from the payment of the special tax called the "serebschizna." In 1559 the city authorities of Novogrudok were ordered by the king to place no obstacles in the way of the Jewish lcaseholders Jacob Ikhelovich of Brest-Litovsk and Nissan Khaimovich of Grodno in their work of collecting customs duties. By an edict dated Sept. 24, 1563, King Sigismund ordered the Jews of Novogrudok to settle in the lower part of the town on the streets Wilna and Trumko on the farther side of the castle, and to cease erecting new buildings on the street Podlyaskaya. The Jews were not prompt to comply with the new regulations, for in the following year the burghers of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 566 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 29mm | 998g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123692519X
  • 9781236925190