The Japanese Problem in the United States; An Investigation for the Commission on Relations with Japan Appointed by the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America Volume 3

The Japanese Problem in the United States; An Investigation for the Commission on Relations with Japan Appointed by the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ... entering the grades. The establishment of a school of this character should leave no problem connected with the public schools. The Problem of the Religious and General Social Life of the Community.--The problem connected with the religious and general social life is more difficult as seen by those who are trying to solve it and who have the greatest goodwill for the Japanese. The Methodist church is the center of the better social life of the community and is presided over by an unusually capable man in Mr. Buckner. A building has been purchased across the street for the Japanese mission, and this serves for the Sunday school and as a center for the social life of the small number of Japanese who are Christians. But what shall be done to bring the races belonging to the same church together in social intercourse as the number of young Japanese growing up increases? As yet the races are being held apart because it is thought any other policy would cause the Americans to withdraw. There is a feeling that the situation is such that a unified social life with the church as a center is impossible. From his sympathetic point of view the pastor expresses the opinion that Florin has a social problem--and one not entirely due to the fact that except for the church and the individual efforts of a very few like Miss Alice Brown, no effort is being made to make one civilization out of two diverse ones represented on the same soil. With few exceptions the people of Florin are opposed to an immigration policy which, whatever the economics of the matter may be, develops a situation such as is found in their community. The character of the houses in this community, the character of the agricultural work of greatest importance, the contribution of the Japanese...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236560760
  • 9781236560766