Jacob's Rod; A Translation from the French of a Rare and Curious Work, A.D. 1693, on the Art of Findings Springs, Mines and Minerals by Means of the Hazel Rod ...

Jacob's Rod; A Translation from the French of a Rare and Curious Work, A.D. 1693, on the Art of Findings Springs, Mines and Minerals by Means of the Hazel Rod ...

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1887 edition. Excerpt: ...limits, perpetually remaining there, that they reproduce it, and, being of the same nature as those in the air, in the space of separation, they keep them there attaehedlike a tree which is upon its root, or by the inclination which they have to re-unite with their like, and make them re'main there, so that they present themselves to the man the same as the intentional kinds to memory; the reason is the same for both. It is certain that these particles, or those which are reproduced by them, remain about these limits, either flying about or running continually from one limit to another, or all along the separation where they are seen, they tend downwards continually. towards those which are attached to the limits, which causes a similar movement to the rod when one traverses them, as that which it receives in traversing a source or a mine. and a contrary one when in following the length one opposes their passage, the same as one sees a contrary one when in ascending a source or vein ofa mine, one opposes the passage of the particles which are following their bent. One will object, that if this movement is similar to that made over mines, springs. &c., why does the rod turn upon the visible stone of limit, and not over water or the matter of the mine. This difficulty can be resolved, but to make it more clear I shall observe three things, the first that the particles emanated from surrounding parties, which are enclosed with the limits are so united in them. that they may be said to be concentrated; the second, that the supcrficies of the apparent limit, like that of the ground of separation, have no part in this re-_ union, the same as the surface of the man has no part in the kinds which he encloses in himself The third, that the..show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236805003
  • 9781236805003