An Itinerary Containing His Ten Yeeres Travell Through the Twelve Dominions of Germany, Bohmerland, Sweitzerland, Netherland, Denmarke, Poland, Italy, Turky, France, England, Scotland & Ireland Volume . 4

An Itinerary Containing His Ten Yeeres Travell Through the Twelve Dominions of Germany, Bohmerland, Sweitzerland, Netherland, Denmarke, Poland, Italy, Turky, France, England, Scotland & Ireland Volume . 4

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ...old age) doth not make the guift of lesse force: but by the Law of Saxony, a man or woman sicke to death, cannot without the consent of the heires, give any goods above the value of five shillings, so as a certaine solemnity is required among the sicke, and also those that are healthfull, in the gift of any moveable or unmoveable goods: For among the sicke or healthfull, he that will give any goods, if he be of Knightly Order, hee must be of that strength, as armed with his Sword and Target, he can upon a stone or block 1605 an ell high mount his horse, and his servant is admitted also to hold his stirrop. If he be a Citizen, he must be able to walke in the way, to draw his Sword, and to stand upright before the Judge, while the gift is made: And a Clowne must be able to follow the Plow one morning. Lastly, a woman must be of that strength, as shee can goe to the Church of a certaine distance, and there stand so long till the guift be made: but these things are understood of guifts among the living, not of guifts upon death. By the Civill Law guifts are of force, though made out of the place where the goods are seated: but by the Law of Saxony for unmoveable goods the guift must bee made in the place, and before the Judge of the place, where the goods are seated, onely some cases excepted. By the Civill Law, the heire that makes no Inventory, is tied to the Creditors, above the goods of Inheritance; but by the Law of Saxony he is neither tied to make an Inventory, nor to pay further then the goods of the deceased extend. By the Civill Law, within ten dayes, IH.iv.j and by the Law of Saxony, within thirty dayes after the death of him that dies, the heire may not be troubled by the creditors. An Imperiall Statute decrees, that he who makes...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 395g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236912357
  • 9781236912350