Ironclads in Action; A Sketch of Naval Warfare from 1855 to 1895, with Some Account of the Development of the Battleship in England Volume 2

Ironclads in Action; A Sketch of Naval Warfare from 1855 to 1895, with Some Account of the Development of the Battleship in England Volume 2

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Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...So also in the Brooklyn. The French are removing the after military mast from many of their ships. On the one hand, military masts are valuable for signalling and top-fire at close quarters: on the other hand it is doubtful whether they would survive the preliminary encounter. The maintenance of communications within the ship during action is even more important than the maintenance of her communications with the admiral. How far is it possible to use voice-pipes in the turmoil of battle? We read how at the Yalu officers fought with their ears plugged and yet remained deaf for weeks. There will be, not only the tremendous din and concussion of the ship's own guns, but the not less disquieting crash of the enemy's shells, and the crunch and jar of the iron under the blows. In the ship's interior will be smoke from high explosive shells, smoke, perhaps, from the funnels, and smoke from fire. Voicepipes may be severed by heavy projectiles impinging upon the tubes which carry them down, or perforating the armour. A trustworthy system of signalling from one part of the ship to another is most urgently required. It should be operated by electricity, have a reply-indicator, and should supplement the existing voice-pipes Mischances with the present form The telephone has been suggested, but in the uproar of battle might be difficult to use. of engine-room telegraph, which is purely mechanical, are constantly occurring, and in the Victoria disaster the catastrophe may have been aggravated by its failure on the Camper down to convey an order correctly at a very critical moment. There may be many critical moments in battle when such a failure would mean destruction. A string of men to pass orders is found not only on board the Monitor in 1862, but on board...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236514394
  • 9781236514394