The Irish Parliament in the Eighteenth Century

The Irish Parliament in the Eighteenth Century : The Long Apprenticeship

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Description

A history of the Irish parliament in the eighteenth century.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 156 pages
  • 156 x 234 x 24mm | 229g
  • EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • maps
  • 0748615113
  • 9780748615117

Table of contents

Introduction: The Long Apprenticeship D W Hayton, Queen's University, Belfast Parliamentary Additional Supply: The Development and Use of Regular Short-Term Taxation, 1692-1716 C I McGrath, University College Dublin Criminal Legislation, 1692-1760 Neal Garnham, University of Sunderland Coal, Corn and Canals: The Dispersal of Public Moneys, 1695-1772 Eoin Magennis, Linen Hall Library, Belfast Monitoring the Constitution: The Operation of Poynings' Law in the 1760s James Kelly, St Patrick's College, Drumcondra Considering the Inconsiderable: Electors, Patrons and Irish Elections, 1659-1761 T C Barnard, Hertford College, Oxford Sir Henry Cavendish and the Proceedings of the Irish House of Commons, 1776-1800 A P W Malcomson, formerly Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, and D J Jackson.
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Review quote

The individual essays offer detailed analyses of a variety of parliamentary concerns - taxation, the criminal law, grants for economic 'improvement', the operation of Poynings' Law, electoral behaviour and the recording of parliamentary debates ... Hayton's introduction offers an up-to-date and perceptive survey of the historiography of the Dublin Parliament ... Taken together this collection demonstrates the opportunities for Irish parliamentary historians to break away from the domain of high politics and to focus on the day-to-day workings of the institution." The individual essays offer detailed analyses of a variety of parliamentary concerns - taxation, the criminal law, grants for economic 'improvement', the operation of Poynings' Law, electoral behaviour and the recording of parliamentary debates ... Hayton's introduction offers an up-to-date and perceptive survey of the historiography of the Dublin Parliament ... Taken together this collection demonstrates the opportunities for Irish parliamentary historians to break away from the domain of high politics and to focus on the day-to-day workings of the institution."
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