Irish Equity Reports Argued and Determined in the High Court of Chancery; The Rolls Court, and the Equity Exchequer Volume 6

Irish Equity Reports Argued and Determined in the High Court of Chancery; The Rolls Court, and the Equity Exchequer Volume 6

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...filed. The charge was paid off, and assigned to a trustee, in conformity with the order of the Court. The lunatic subsequently died intestate without issue, and without having recovered his senses. Held, upon a bill filed by his personal representative, that the heir-at-law of the lunatic was entitled to hold the estate freed from the charge, and that the next-of-kin were not entitled to the benefit of the charge. The proper time to decide whether the heir-atlaw, or the next-of-ltin of a lunatic, are to be entitled to the bencfit of payments made out of his estate, is when the payments are made. I ti I., '0 4;, . 0 l 1 t. 4i Shortly after the date of his will, the testator died, leaving George Montgomery the younger his only son, and the three daughters named in his will his only younger children him surviving. In the year 1787, a commission of lunacy issued against George Montgomery the son, under which he was found a lunatic, and Robert Lord Leitrim, Henry Theophilus Clements and Henry Clements, were appointed committee of his estate. In 1789, a bill was filed by the three sisters of the lunatic against him, for the purpose of raising the sums which they were entitled to under the deed of 1778, and the will of their father. A decree to account, and a report under it having been obtained, a final decree was pronounced in that cause upon the 30th of June 1795, directing that the two sums of 10,000 and 10,000, and the interest then due thereon, should be raised by a sale of the estates. No sale was had under this decree, but in the year 1804, a private Act of Parliament was obtained by Robert Earl of Leitrim, then the surviving committee of the lunatic, by which, after reciting the suit and decree, and that the 10,000, ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 328 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 18mm | 585g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236859294
  • 9781236859297