The Irish Episcopal Succession; The Recent Statements of Mr. Froude and Dr. Brady, Respecting the Irish Bishops in the Reign of Elizabeth

The Irish Episcopal Succession; The Recent Statements of Mr. Froude and Dr. Brady, Respecting the Irish Bishops in the Reign of Elizabeth

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1867 edition. Excerpt: ...it at his consecration, and then handed it on to Archbishop Curwin. Thomas Thirlby, Bishop of Ely, the second Bishop who assisted at OurWin's consecration, was consecrated December 19, 1540', by Edmund London (Bonner), Nicholas Rochester (Heath), and John Bedford (Hodgkins). Bonner, as we have shown, possessed the old Irish succession, and therefore handed it on to Thirlby, from whom Curwin received it, by a second line of succession. Maurice Griffin, Bishop of Rochester, the third Bishop who consecrated Curwin, was himself consecrated on April 1, 1554', by Edmund London (Bonner), Cuthbert Durham (Tunstall), and Stephen Winchester (Gardiner). He also, through Bonner, and Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, who was one of the consecrators of Tunstall, had received the Irish succession through a double line, and handed it on to Curwin through a third line of succession. Thus we see that each of the consecrators of Archbishop Curwin possessed the old Irish succession, and imparted it to him at his consecration 5. of York," and allowed, as we have seen, to assist the Archbishop of Canterbury in the consecration of John, Bishop of Exeter. 3 See Stubbs, p. 79. Stubbs, p. 81. " See this shown in a tabular form in Appendix I. Etelfjffines of But this is by no means the only way in which ggggfigytmch it can be shown that Archbishop Curwin was Curwin p0s-possessed of the old Irish succession. In the ages preceding the Reformation many "i"-Irish Bishops, possessed of the old Irish succession, were in the habit of doing permanent duty as suffra'gan Bishops in England, and of assisting at the lconsecration of English Bishops 6. By this means lthe Irish succession was constantly carried over into. England, and received...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236536525
  • 9781236536525