Irish Common Law Reports; Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Courts of Queen's Bench, Common Pleas, Exchequer, Exchequer Chamber, and Court of Criminal Appeal ... Volume 9

Irish Common Law Reports; Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Courts of Queen's Bench, Common Pleas, Exchequer, Exchequer Chamber, and Court of Criminal Appeal ... Volume 9

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1860 edition. Excerpt: ... names off the burgess-roll should be refused. Psnnm, J. I concur in the judgments just pronounced by the CaIEr JUSTICE and my Brother CnAMrron; and, in my opinion, they have given very good and satisfactory reasons for the conclusion at which they have arrived. I cannot help thinking that the object of the Legislature was to induce the lower orders of the people to avail themselves of this eleemosynary medical relief, administered as it is by practi tioners of education and skill. O'BRIEN, J. I entirely concur in the judgment of the Court; and think it most satisfactory that our unanimous conclusion is, that the receiving relief under the Medical Charities Act is not a disqualification under the Municipal Corporation Act. Upon contrasting the provisions of the Municipal Corporation Act with those of the Medical Charities Act, it is clear that the receipt of medical relief is not to be put on the same footing with what I may call parochial relief. The Acts relating to the poor-law are to be read as if they were incorporated in one Act. In the first Poor-law Act (1 & 2 Vz'c., c. 56), the objects of relief are very clearly pointed out_they are destitute persons, who from age, infirmity or defect are unable to provide for themselves (s. 41). The next Act (10 Vic., c. 31) makes provision for out-door relief; but that Act is also expressly confined to the same class of destitute persons, and was passed because it was found that persons out of the poor-house were as much objects of relief as those in the poor-house. But, nevertheless, the relief was, under the latter Act, also confined to persons who came within the description of destitute persons, incapable from age, in-firmity or defect, to maintain themselves or their...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 216 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 395g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236800591
  • 9781236800596