Investigations Upon the Survey of the Coast of the United States; Additional Information to That Communicated in January by Same Committee Upon the Progress and Expenditures of the Coast Survey.] February 9, 1843

Investigations Upon the Survey of the Coast of the United States; Additional Information to That Communicated in January by Same Committee Upon the Progress and Expenditures of the Coast Survey.] February 9, 1843

List price: US$14.14

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1843 edition. Excerpt: ...move onward year by year, and inundate the country. In passing over a desert of this kind at Schevening, on a windy day, the atmosphere appears dim with the particles of sand blown like smoke through the air. The height of the dunes depends on the fineness of the sand, as the wind has of course the most power in transporting the minuter particles. Campendown, memorable in the naval annals of Britain, is one of the loftiest on the whole coast, for this reason. To check the dispersion of the sand, and put a stop to this evil, the dunes are sowed regularly every year with plants congenial to it, for even sand has a vegetation peculiar to itself, which may be called luxuriant; but a species of reed grass, which grows near the sea, (arundo arenaria, ) is principally employed, and to great advantage.--Murray's Handbook for Travellers on the Continent, p. 13. Light-house establishment, 1842. That some of our light-houses should be undermined by the encroachment of the sea, and have to be taken down and removed further back, is not strange; it is a circumstance they will always be liable to. It is no fault of those who selected the sites or built the light-houses. I have had an opportunity of observing the encroachment of the sea on our whole coast for thirty years, visiting every light-house in the United States once every year for sixteen years. Capes, with the ocean on one side, and the rapid current of some river on the other, as Cape Henlopen and Cape Henry, are the most liable to wash away; but your light-houses must be located at those capes, and must not be set too far back from the shore. The shore continuing to recede for a series of years will oblige you to remove some of your light-houses further back. This cannot be avoided. There are many...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 46 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 100g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236604806
  • 9781236604804