Investigation of Panama Canal Matters; Hearings Before the Committee on Interoceanic Canals of the United States Senate in the Matter of the Senate Resolution Adopted January 9, 1906, Providing for an Investigation of Matters Volume 3

Investigation of Panama Canal Matters; Hearings Before the Committee on Interoceanic Canals of the United States Senate in the Matter of the Senate Resolution Adopted January 9, 1906, Providing for an Investigation of Matters Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...dated May 26, 1904. So far, there has been no occasion to exercise the authority delegated to the Commission by the President in his instructions to the Secretary of War of May 9, 1904, conferring upon them the power to expel from the Canal Zone certain criminal, vicious, or undesirable characters. JAILS. The need for a prison where criminals under sentence may be confined is evident, and steps have been taken to erect one within the Canal Zone. The municipal lockups are rude and insecure affairs, and the system of subsisting prisoners wholly bad. When an individual is confined, the family or friends of the person must feed them or they will go hungry. If there is no one whatever who volunteers to supply food, the alcalde allows a small pittance with which the prisoner may purchase rood, but the amount is only sufficient to pay for an inadequate supply of the plainest and cheapest subsistence. On several occasions the police have found it necessary to release persons locked up by the alcaldes who had received no food for two or three days. HEALTH AND SANITATION. The instructions of the President required that every precaution be taken to protect the employees of the Government against the tropical diseases that have previously caused a high mortality at Panama. An experienced officer of the naval medical service, already on the Isthmus, was directed to report to the undersigned, and to concert measures with the canal employees and the local members of his profession for preventing infection and warding off sickness. He was announced as acting chief sanitary officer on May 19, 1904. In the French company's staff were two doctors employed, one at the hospital near Panama and the other with the principal force of workmen who were employed in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 584 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 30mm | 1,030g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236664892
  • 9781236664891