An Introductory Treatise on Mensuration, in Theory and in Practice; Containing the Investigation of Every Principle, and Several Improved Rules of Operation

An Introductory Treatise on Mensuration, in Theory and in Practice; Containing the Investigation of Every Principle, and Several Improved Rules of Operation

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1853 edition. Excerpt: ...the cube is a particular case. It also presents six sides or faces, all of which are parallelograms, though not necessarily squares. It is a rectangular or an oblique parallelopiped, accordingly as these faces are rectangular or oblique. The opposite faces of every parallelopiped are parallel planes: that is to say, planes, which however far extended, never meet. 3. A Prism is a solid, whose side-faces, be they few or many, are all parallelograms, and the ends parallel and rectilineal plane figures, in every respect equal. If the parallelograms which form the sides are rectangles, the prism is a rectangular or upright prism; otherwise it is an oblique prism. It is plain, that a parallelopiped is but a particular case of the prism. Prism3 are distinguished from one another by the form of the end or base. If the base be a triangle, it is called a triangular prism; if a square, a square prism; if a pentagon, a pentagonal prism; and if the base is any irregular figure, it is called an irregular prism: in all cases, however, the side-faces are parallelograms. 4. A Circular Cylinder is a round body. Like the prism, its ends are equal and parallel figures; but these figures are circles. Its lateral surface is also circular and uniform, so that if it were at any part cut through, by a plane parallel to the base, the section would be a circle equal to that base. The line joining the centre of the two ends, and thus passing through the centre of every section parallel to them, is called the axis of the cylinder. If this axis be perpendicular to the base or end, the cylinder is called a right cylinder, an upright cylinder, or a rectangular cylinder; when the axis is oblique to the base, it is called an oblique cylinder. The circular cylinder is not the only...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 72 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 145g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236610032
  • 9781236610034